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  Haan Mansion Museum
  920 E State Street
  Lafayette, IN 47905
St. Louis World's Fair

The Mansion was originally the State of Connecticut building at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. Connecticut chose architect Edward T. Hapgood to design the building. The state wanted their pavilion to represent a country gentleman's home, and the architect patterned the building after the 1820 Sigourney Mansion in Hartford. Many components were taken from the 1760 Hubbard-Slater Mansion in Norwich including the front entryway, various interior columns, and door capitals.

Painting of the Haan Mansion

The mansion has three above ground floors and a full basement totaling 15,000 square feet. It also includes seven fireplaces and 4 1/2 baths.
The mansion was designed and built to be moved after the World's Fair. It was dismantled and moved to Lafayette, Indiana, immediately after the Fair by Mr. and Mrs.William Potter and became their personal residence. There are only 15 known buildings surviving from the Fair, and the Haan Mansion is most true to its original design and purpose of the 13 buildings removed from the grounds.

Grand Hall
Wooten Desk

American Furniture

This Wooten desk is just one example of the period Renaissance Revival furniture found in the mansion.
Tours Available

Since the Mansion is still the private residence of Bob and Ellie Haan, it is not open continually. However, tours are scheduled at certain times and can be found on the tours page. Group tours can also be arranged.
Three Museums in One

More than an art museum, a tour of the mansion is truly a rare experience: fantastic furniture, wonderful art, and important porcelain in a historical setting on a grand scale. It's an experience you won't soon forget.

A Treasure of Indiana Art

The mansion contains a very large collection of Indiana art, featuring the works of T. C. Steele and other Hoosier Group artists as well as the Brown County Art Colony.
Indiana Painting Grand Entrance

Grand Staircase